Bray and Wicklow Attractions

Bray Head 

To get some of the most stunning views of Bray, look no further than Bray Head. The hill dominates the end of the promenade and the stone cross atop the hill is an iconic feature of the town. While the climb is not particularly daunting, some parts can be a bit of a challenge and require some scrambling. But if the hike up doesn’t leave you breathless the views sure will!

 

Bray Head Cliff Path

One of the highlights of walking in Wicklow. This linear walk takes you from Bray to Greystones or vice versa along the stunning coastal path. The path is well maintained and you can return by DART to the start point, or walk back again. Greystones has plenty to offer the hungry walker after beautiful views and a range of marine wildlife.  From Bray start, there is a path leading to the top of Bray Head offering stunning views of the Irish Sea, The Wicklow Mountains and Bray.

 

Kilruddery House & Gardens

Often described as a wonderful place to escape for a great day out, Killruddery has been home to the Brabazon Family (the Earls of Meath) since 1618. There’s so much to see and explore. Nature has never been more relaxing with leisurely walks in one of Ireland’s most renowned gardens, filled with beautiful planting and wooded areas, water features and distinctive outdoor “rooms”. A delightful Tea Room and guided tours of one of Ireland’s Great Historic Houses are just some of the other treats on offer. 

 

Sugarloaf

Great Sugar Loaf Mountain dominates the skyline as you drive south from Dublin into Wicklow. This unique mountain stands apart from the rest of the upland and is instantly recognisable by its conical shape. The route starts in a car park on Red Lane under a concrete arch. The obvious track leads you up onto a shoulder where the track turns right with loose rock underfoot. A steep climb brings you to the summit and return the same route.

 

Glendalough

Glendalough is a glacial valley renowned for an Early Medieval monastic settlement founded in the 6th century by St Kevin. Glendalough is also a recreational area for picnics, for walking along networks of maintained trails of varying difficulty, and also for rock-climbing.

 

Powerscourt House & Waterfall

Powerscourt is one of the world’s great gardens. Set against the backdrop of the great Sugarloaf Mountain, Powerscourt is stunning in every season. From the ornate Italian Gardens, to the formal walks of the Rose and Kitchen Gardens, there are many hidden treasures to explore. With over 200 varieties of trees, shrubs and flowers this 47 acres has something for everyone.

 

Wicklow National Park 

The National Park which covers much of upland Wicklow, contains an area of approximately 20,000 hectares (49,421 acres). This includes large areas of mountain blanket bogs, including the Lugnaquilla and Liffey Head Bog complexes and Glendalough Wood Nature Reserve. The National Park provides protection for the landscape and the wildlife, from rare orchids to the wild and beautiful Peregrine Falcon. Wicklow Mountains National Park runs a wide variety of activities for groups and individuals of all ages. Activities are free of charge and include field trips, nature walks, lectures and workshops.

 

Brittas Bay

Brittas has a 5km stretch of powdery sand and sand dunes, it is designated as a proposed Special Area of Conservation (SAC). It is an area of ecological importance and habitats of interest include sand dunes, ferns and grassland areas. The landscape is dominated by the dunes which cover approx 100 hectares. The beach is life guarded throughout the bathing season.